Pet Peeves At A Concert; A Rant Coming Up!

Good morning!
Recently, I was lucky enough to be able to see Emeli Sande live in concert, thanks to a very generous offer of press tickets. But whilst I was there, a few things really annoyed me, whilst trying to enjoy a good concert. So, but if a grumpy post today, but here are my pet peeves at a concert:
The person always on their phone.

Throughout the concert, they will be on Facebook, Instagram, even Snapchat. And only part of this is to document the concert going on in front of them. The huge, lumimous screen is the distraction-seemingly exarcebated by the darkness a concert usually takes place in. Can’t we just enjoy it, without technology, for once? Like back when Rock concerts were a full foot-stamping-sing-along affair? Because that looks far more entertaining and enjoyable.

People moving about the row.
Or even just walking out. There’s probably a clearer cut exit path than having to bumble down one fully packed out row. Instead of going through a throng of people, and treading in their toes, why not go out the right way?

Hecklers
At a stand up concert, the put downs can be rather funny. (Look up Jimmy Carr vs Blonde Women on YouTube if you don’t believe me!) But at a concert? I remember seeing Anastacia back in 2015, yet whilst she was talking-due to a Q&A feature of the Resurrection tour-a group were constantly heckling her, meaning we couldn’t hear her. It’s not funny! And it was all really crude axioms, seemingly sexual, that were being shouted. I wish for the artist to be in control, and to enjoy their show. Heckling is not very funny at a rock concert.
Playing your own music.
You pay decent money to watch a show, but then there’s always one person who gets their phone out, in order to play their own music, usually during the middle of a song. Why?! Just Why?! We come to hear the artist, often on in a quite pricey ticket, not your rap music that’s muffled in its sound. Turn it off, sit down, and enjoy the show. You won’t annoy anyone, promise.

Feet on seats.

Why is it acceptable to put your feet up on the back of somebody else’s chair? Even if there is very limited leg room, I don’t wish to smell your stinky shoes, or to be annoyed at you kicking my chair. Besides, you can always stamp your feet in time to the beat on the floor.
What are your pet peeves at a concert?
Lydia
XO

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Why I dislike having my photo taken..


Photos. Photos. Photos. Uggghhhh.

I really dislike having my photo taken. And as a warning, this post was written as a ‘rant’-although I’m trying to be logical and balanced. That’s a possible fail.

Anyway, back to the topic; I dislike having my photo taken. I really detest it-the awkwardness, coupled with the fact that it’ll possibly be put on display-be it a byline photo, your parents mantelpiece, newspaper, etc. (The latter one was a particular ‘favourite’; me smiling with a rather large tongue stuck out. How embarrassing.)

In my lifetime, there’s been a general increase in technological culture;you’re reading this blog right now, for instance. We Instagram, tweet, Facebook, email, read e-books. Essentially, we move electronically, in amongst this huge field of data. But what happens with such a thing as trolling?

In spite of the fact that I’m a blogger, my life is still private to me; I have every right to maintain my privacy. I may write about my social impairment, yet you don’t know intimate details of that. You don’t know my friendships, my likes or dislikes, what I eat for dinner, etc. 

Plus, I’m just awkward. And there’s so much time between posing and snapping!

Caitlin Moran wrote the brilliant piece about why she doesn’t just smile, but brings out her ‘Muppet face’ for photos-simply because it proves the point she isn’t static, but rather alive and kicking. But I think I’ve used that trick for too long-I’m told to smile more often, stand up straight, etc. The mullet face isn’t going to work any more.

As long as I’m laughing, I’m happy, just not comfortable in photos.

What do you think about having your photo taken?

Lydia

XO

In defence of social media. 

Looking back over a few of my posts, I’ve begun to think and feel that my writing has become a little bit constrained-almost stilted, to the point that it’s a little bit bland. There’s no real opinion-just a middle ground-or any real engagement. Therefore, for the purpose of this post, I wanted to debate the merits of social media-and would love to hear your thoughts in the comments, ironically enough. (It’ll also probably be a bit of an odd opinion piece; after all, I’m a blogger writing this!)

In recent times, Social Media seems to have reached its pinnacle: there’s new filters on Snapchat, we hear about a young girl tweeting from Aleppo, and the crisis ostensibly surrounding ‘Fake news’. Really, it seems to have seeped into just about every function that we have. 

I find that social media can be heavily criticised, particularly if anyone is perceived as always interacting with it. There’s ostensibly too many cat photos, memes, etc-that apparently make the whole form a waste of time. It seemingly doesn’t achieve greatly, in terms of interactions. It’s just a communication function, right?

Wrong.

In referencing The Big Life by Ann Shoket, out in March, social media and other forms of technology has helped transform services and careers dramatically. Instead of randomly tweeting cute dog photos, to nobody in particular, these people in pursuit of The Big Life have built a career on the back of social media-such as with beauty vloggers, Journalists, bloggers, etc. Surely that’s incredible? These entrepreneurs are of a new generation, and have utilised a new asset to transform the careers sector.

It’s also a new way of digesting media; in covering a crisis, you’ll probably find more out about it on Twitter, Snapchat, whatever. (Although this does bring in the issue of fake news, this mode is authentic in its pace, reception, and transmission.) It’ll be a while prior to major new websites and newspapers breaking the story. And maybe this new journalism could be a good thing-in raising awareness, and keeping world leaders to account. (Just keep in mind about fake news-excerise caution in reading.)

To me, social media is a huge asset-and I write this as a blogger, a teenager, a student, and a high functioning autistic. As long as it’s utilised in the right way, we may just get somewhere.

What do you think about social media? Leave your thoughts in the comments-

Lydia

XO